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Variety | ‘The Women’s Balcony’ Review

Variety

A close-knit congregation fractures along gender lines after a catastrophe at their synagogue, in Emil Ben Shimon’s nicely observed dramedy “The Women’s Balcony.” Offering solid, middle-brow entertainment that borrows from Aristophanes’ “Lysistrata,” the film shows the relationships and tensions between different groups within Orthodox Judaism in Jerusalem, and provides a cautionary (and universally understandable) tale about religious fundamentalism.

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